Fleur de Sel

Posted by Brenda Marmolejo on

“Fleur de Sel” literally translates “flower of salt” and it is a kind of salt that is formed as a thin, delicate crust on the surface of seawater as it evaporates. The name comes from the flower like patterns of crystals in the salt crust. Fleur de Sel is considered the “caviar of salts” by chefs and foodies around the world, its delicate flavour and high concentration of minerals makes it the perfect finishing salt.

Fleur de Sel has been collected since ancient times and now, is used as a finishing salt to flavour and garnish food. The fine light crystals dissolve instantly when sprinkled into food and is one of those indispensable touches that really make a difference for some dishes.

In Mexico, it is known as Flor de Sal, and it has been produced since Aztec times from the Lagoon of Cuyutlán on the Pacific Coast. There is even a museum in Cuyutlán, dedicated to the history and technique of Flor de Sal production. Flor de sal is also harvested along the beaches of Celeste in Yucatan, Mexico where Mayans cultivated salt 1,500 years ago for its distribution throughout Mesoamerican trade routes extending to Guatemala, Central America and the Caribbean.

The Mexican Flour du Sel used in the Charred Corn & Lime is from Cuyutlán in the Pacific Ocean. Its delicate nature makes it a perfect finishing ingredient for salads, fish, meat, fruit and vegetables. Try it and season your food as a top chef!


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